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how to migrate live virtual machine in vmware vSphere


VMware vMotion

Migrate live virtual machine

vMotion keeps your IT environment up and running, giving you unprecedented flexibility and availability to meet the increasing demands of your business and end users.

vMotion allows you to:

  • Perform live migrations with zero downtime, undetectable to the user.
  • Continuously and automatically optimize virtual machines within resource pools.
  • Perform hardware maintenance without scheduling downtime and disrupting business operations.
  • Proactively move virtual machines away from failing or underperforming servers.

Here is, How to do it?

Select the Virtual Machine in vClient to Migrate

Select the Virtual Machine in vClient to Migrate

Migrate Virtual Machine - Select Migration Type

Migrate Virtual Machine – Select Migration Type

Migrate Virtual Machine - Select Destination

Migrate Virtual Machine – Select Destination

Migrate Virtual Machine - Select Resource Pool

Migrate Virtual Machine – Select Resource Pool

Migrate Virtual Machine - Select vMotion Policy - High Priority

Migrate Virtual Machine – Select vMotion Policy – High Priority

 

Migrate Virtual Machine - Summary

Migrate Virtual Machine – Summary

References:

http://www.vmware.com/products/vmotion/overview.html

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What is openstack

OpenStack offers open-source software to build public and private clouds started by Rackspace (“Cloud Files” platform) and NASA (Nebula) in 2010. Currently Intel, Cisco, Dell, HP, AMD, Canonical, SUSE Linux, Red Hat, and IBM have joined the OpenStack project. It is released under the Apache license. There are 3 main service families under OpenStack: 1) a Presentation Layer interacts with users to accept and present information 2) the Logic Layer handles intelligence and control functionality for the cloud 3) the Resources Layer contains Compute, Storage and Network Resources for Cloud.

OpenStack has a modular architecture, which includes components such as compute, object storage, image service, identity, dashboard, networking, and block-storage. OpenStack has Amazon EC2 and Amazon S3-compatible APIs.

Use cases:

  • Service providers offering an IaaS compute platform
  • IT departments provisioning compute resources to teams and projects
  • Big Data processing with Hadoop
  • Scaling up and scaling down resources to meet demand for Web resources and applications

What is big data

Big Data – “Big data” is data that becomes large enough that it cannot be processed using conventional methods.

Web search engines, social networks, mobile phones, sensors and science chip in to petabytes of data created on a daily basis. Scientists, intelligence analysts, governments, meteorologists, air traffic controllers, architects, civil engineers-nearly every industry or profession experience the era of big data. Add to that the fact that the democratization of IT has made everyone a (sort of) data expert, well-known with searches and queries, and we’re seeing a huge burst of awareness in big data.

The greater part of data has multifaceted and undiscovered relationships. It doesn’t fit simply into relational models.

Let’s see some of the practical examples for big data processing.

A.    LinkedIn:

·         For discovering People You May Know and other fun facts.

·         Item-Item Recommendations

·         Member and Company Derived Data

·         User’s network statistics

·         Who Viewed My Profile?

·         Abuse detection

·         User’s History Service

·         Relevance data

·         Crawler detection

B.    MobileAnalytic.TV:

·         Natural Language Processing

·         Mobile Social Network Hacking

·         Web Crawlers/Page scrapping

·         Text to Speech

·         Machine generated Audio & Video with remixing

·         Automatic PDF creation & IR

C.    Datagraph

·         Batch-processing large RDF datasets, for indexing RDF data. RDF extends the linking structure of the Web to use URIs to name the relationship between things as well as the two ends of the link.

·         Executing long-running offline SPARQL queries

D.    GumGum-Iin-image ad network

·         GumGum is an analytics and monetization platform for online content.

·         Image and advertising analytics

E.    Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center – Bioinformatics Group

·         For accumulating and analyzing Next Generation sequencing data produced for the Cancer Genome Atlas project and other groups.

F.    Pharm2Phork Project – Agricultural Traceability

·         Processing of observation messages generated by RFID/Barcode readers as items move through supply chain.

·         Analysis of BPEL generated log files for monitoring and tuning of workflow processes.

 

Creating server templates in vmware esxi

VMware Template Clone to Template and Convert into Template

It’s been a cumbersome activity to create new virtual machines with the software stack installed and configured properly. You can always use tools like KickStart to automatically install the operating system and then install other software as needed.

Configurations of specific application is a complex activity since it may involve manual activity of database configuration or application configuration.

Solution introduced by VMware

Template: a pre-developed VM used to make new VM with a similar Software Stack, Configurations.

VMware ESX Server templates can be a time-saving for virtualization administrators as they allow you to clone, convert(Live VMs) and deploy virtual machines.

You can pick and configure every piece of software you will need into a template, and clone it to new instances whenever needed. It’s not only easier but also much faster.

Convert To Template

Offline Machine

It can be “Clone to Template” and “Converted into Template”.

VMware ESXi - Convert to Template

VMware ESXi – Convert to Template

Clone to Template

VMware ESXi - Clone to Template

VMware ESXi – Clone to Template

VMware ESXi - Clone to Template - Name and Location

VMware ESXi – Clone to Template – Name and Location

VMware ESXi - Clone to Template - Host and Cluster

VMware ESXi – Clone to Template – Host and Cluster

VMware ESXi - Clone to Template - Database

VMware ESXi – Clone to Template – Database

VMware ESXi - Clone to Template - Disk Format

VMware ESXi – Clone to Template – Disk Format

VMware ESXi - Clone to Template - Summary

VMware ESXi – Clone to Template – Summary

Live Virtual Machine

Live VM can only be “Clone to Template”; it cannot be Converted into Template.

Convert Template into VM

Select a Template->Right Click-> Convert to a Virtual Machine

VMware ESXi - Convert Template into VM - Host and Cluster

VMware ESXi – Convert Template into VM – Host and Cluster

VMware ESXi - Convert Template into VM - Resource Pool

VMware ESXi – Convert Template into VM – Resource Pool

VMware ESXi - Convert Template into VM - Summary

VMware ESXi – Convert Template into VM – Summary

Related articles

virtual machine – Definition

Virtual machine

A virtual machine (VM) is a software implementation of a computing environment in which an OS or program can be installed and run; VM is a collection of files.

The VM normally emulates a physical computing environment. CPU, memory, disk storage, network, and other resources are managed by a virtualization layer (hypervisor) which translates these requests to the underlying physical hardware. Hypervisor is used to create and run virtual machines. Bare3 metal hypervisors run directly on host hardware while hosted hypervisor run within an os environment.

A virtual machine (VM) is an isolated guest operating system installed within a normal host operating system. VM is a software implementation of a physical machine (i.e. a computer) that executes programs like a physical machine.

According to VMware, VM is a securely isolated software container that can run its own operating systems and applications as if it were a physical computer. A virtual machine operates exactly like a physical computer and it has its own virtual RAM, disk storage, CPU, and network interface card.

Free Cloud Assessment Tool – Cloud Readiness Flight-Check

Cloud Readiness Flight-Check

Click on the Image to Download Whitepaper

  •  The Cloud Readiness Flight Check is an online channel-focused tool which encourages prospects to assess how ready they are for the Cloud. The end user is guided through a dynamic survey which identifies their organization’s Cloud readiness and how they can accelerate their journey to the Cloud. The EMC partner will generate sales leads, primarily focusing on storage, back up, mission-critical applications and virtualization solutions.
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From a commercial perspective, the Cloud Readiness Flight Check offers the most value for EMC partners who are pioneers of Cloud are computing. These EMC partners will be equipped to further evaluate a prospect’s Cloud environment including their strategy, infrastructure, technologies and processes. From a technical perspective, the Cloud Readiness Flight Check is to be self-hosted by EMC partners. The tool is suitable for EMC partners who have a web operations team or external support available to assist the marketing team in hosting bespoke online tools.

 

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what is OpenStack

Introduction

OpenStack offers open source software to build public and private clouds started by Rackspace (“Cloud Files” platform) and NASA (Nebula) in 2010. Currently more than 150 companies have joined the project such as Intel, Cisco, Dell, HP, AMD, Canonical, SUSE Linux, Red Hat, and IBM.

There are 3 main service families under OpenStack:

1. OpenStack Services

Figure 1: OpenStack Services

Presentation Layer: components here interact with users to accept and present information.

Logic Layer: intelligence and control functionality for cloud.

Resources Layer: Compute, Storage and Network Resources for Cloud.

Compute Infrastructure (Nova)

 OpenStack Architecture

Figure 2: OpenStack Architecture

  • Nova: cloud computing fabric controller
  • Instance life cycle management
  • Management of compute resources
  • Networking and Authorization
  • REST-based API
  • Asynchronous eventually consistent communication
  • Hypervisor agnostic: support for Xen, XenServer/XCP, KVM, UML, VMware vSphere and
  • Hyper-V [No virtualization capabilities by itself; instead, it uses libvirt APIs to interact with the supported hypervisors.]

Use Cases:

v  Service providers offering an IaaS compute platform

v  IT departments provisioning compute resources to teams and projects

v  Processing big data with tools like Hadoop

v  Scaling compute up and down to meet demand for web resources and applications

Storage Infrastructure (Swift)

Swift provides a distributed, eventually consistent virtual object store for OpenStack. It is analogous to Amazon Web Services – Simple Storage Service (S3).

  • Storage of large number of objects
  • Storage of large sized objects
  • Data Redundancy
  • Archival capabilities – Work with large datasets
  • Data container for virtual machines and cloud apps
  • Media Streaming capabilities
  • Secure storage of objects
  • Backup and archival
  • Extreme scalability

Imaging Service (Glance)

OpenStack Imaging Service is a lookup and retrieval system for virtual machine images. It can be configured to use any one of the following 3 storage back-ends:

  • OpenStack Object Store to store images
  • S3 storage directly
  • S3 storage with Object Store as the intermediate for S3 access

Image Management

OpenStack Image Services are used for discovering, registering, and retrieving virtual machine images. The service includes a RESTful API that allows users to query VM image metadata and retrieve the actual image with HTTP requests. VM images made available through OpenStack Image Service can be stored in OpenStack Object Storage project, S3 storage.

Instance Management

An instance is a virtual machine provisioned by OpenStack on one of the nova-compute servers. When you launch an instance, a series of steps are triggered on various components of the OpenStack.

OpenStack Instance Life Cycle

Figure 3: OpenStack Instance Life Cycle

Network Management

In OpenStack, the networking is managed by a component called “nova-network”. This interacts with nova-compute to ensure that the instances have the right kind of networking setup for them to communicate among themselves as well as with the outside world.

  • Flat Network
  • Flat DHCP Network
  • VLAN Network

Identity Service

The OpenStack Identity Service provides services for authenticating and managing user, account, and role information for OpenStack clouds running on OpenStack Compute and as an authorization service for OpenStack Object Storage.

Hypervisors Support

List of the supported hypervisors with links to a relevant web site for configuration and use:

  • Hyper-V 2008 – Use to run Windows-based virtual machines, specifically Windows 2008 R2 Datacenter or Enterprise Edition. You must install and run nova-compute on Windows servers that run the Windows-based virtual machines.
  • KVM – Kernel-based Virtual Machine. The virtual disk formats that it supports it inherit from QEMU since it uses a modified QEMU program to launch the virtual machine. The supported formats include raw images, the qcow2, and VMware formats.
  • LXC – Linux Containers (through libvirt), use to run Linux-based virtual machines.
  • QEMU – Quick EMUlator, generally only used for development purposes.
  • UML – User Mode Linux, generally only used for development purposes.
  • VMWare ESX/ESXi 4.1 update 1, runs VMWare-based Linux and Windows images through a connection with the ESX server.
  • Xen – XenServer 5.5, Xen Cloud Platform (XCP), use to run Linux or Windows virtual machines. You must install the nova-compute service on DomU.